A New Hampshire lady who purchased a Powerball ticket priced at $560 million previous months is struggling to keep her identity secret, stating in a lawsuit that publishing her name would “constitute a significant invasion of her privacy.”

The lady registered a lawsuit versus the New Hampshire Lottery Commission beneath the pseudonym Jane Doe. She states she did a “huge mistake” when she signed with her original name on the end of the document before communicating a lawyer, who advised her she could have continued secret had she built a trust and then had a guardian mark the paper.

The lawsuit, registered previous week, depicts the lady as an “engaged community member.”

The complaint stated, “She wishes to continue this work and the freedom to walk into a grocery store or attend public events without being known or targeted as the winner of a half-billion dollars”. It continues that she intends on living in New Hampshire and returning back “to the state and community that has given so much to her.”

The woman is depicted by the law firm of Shaheen and Gordon. William Shaheen drafted a blog post-Jan. 8, two days following the drawing, that reflects a light on the challenges the lawsuit might face.

“Don’t sign that back of the ticket because if you sign it you lost confidentiality,” he answers. “It becomes public, and you lost the option of staying anonymous.”

The lady has not yet declared the award, and the suit states the battle for her anonymity is obligating her a fortune in interest.

The New Hampshire Lottery realizes that acquiring a $560 million Powerball prize is a life-changing experience,” Charlie McIntyre, the New Hampshire Lottery’s executive director, told in a report.

McIntyre stated he gets the winner’s wish to hold her name from the media. But he announced the state attorney general’s office has instructed him that “the lottery must proceed in accordance its rules and by state law in processing this claim like any other.”

Jane Doe won the Powerball drawing Jan. 6. The ticket was bought at Reeds Ferry Market, a modest convenience store in Merrimack, N.H. The owner even came out a winner, claiming a $75,000 prize for selling the lucky ducat.

“Can you believe someone just walked into my store and won?!” Safa said USA TODAY previous month. “Most of my customers are local, and I’m hoping it’s someone local. But whoever it is, congratulations to them.”

The lawsuit, though, states Jane Doe now follows a tiny demographic of big jackpot victors that “has historically been victimized by the unscrupulous.” The lawsuit even raises the issue of the opioid crisis in stating that New Hampshire, “despite its bucolic beauty … is not immune to crime.”

“The disclosure of Ms. Doe’s identifying information would constitute an invasion of privacy because the limited public interest in disclosure is far outweighed by Ms. Doe’s interest in remaining anonymous,” the lawsuit asserts.

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